England might have crashed out early, but that doesn’t mean we can’t get into the spirit of things for the final…

The 2014 World Cup is coming to a close, and, while one more country will have their footballing dreams crushed in Sunday’s final match, it’s an occasion for celebration for many – not just for the winners, but for those who are looking forward to something else being on the television.

So, what better way to mark the end of the tournament than with a big old World Cup party? Whether you want to cheer on the team you picked out in the office sweepstake, or, if you’re a bit like me, simply want to celebrate the start of a football-free summer, there’s no better excuse for getting a few friends round and having a fiesta.

Although we know hosts Brazil aren’t going to win this year, we’ve included a couple of Brazilian recipes anyway – we Brits aren’t really in a position to ridicule a team for leaving the tournament early, after all.

Caipirinha

Caipirinha

Let’s start with the drinks. The Caipirinha (ky-pee-REE-nyah) is the Brazilian national cocktail, similar to the Mojito – here’s how best to make it.

Ingredients
150ml cachaça (Brazilian-distilled spirit made from sugar cane, similar to rum)
225ml orange juice
110ml lemon juice
100ml simple sugar syrup (made by heating equal quantities of sugar and water over a medium heat until the sugar has dissolved)
225ml red wine
1 orange, sliced
1 lemon, sliced
A handful of mint leaves

What To Do
Fill a large jug with ice cubes, then add the cachaça, orange and lemon juice and sugar syrup. Give the mixture a stir, then pour in the red wine. If you like, pour the red wine over the back of a tablespoon to create distinct layers within the jug. Garnish with the orange and lemon slices and mint leaves and serve immediately.

Frango

Frango Churrasco (Grilled Lemon and Garlic Chicken)

Brazil is known for its meat and street food too, so, weather permitting, make sure you get out into the garden and fire up the barbecue. The game doesn’t start until 8pm so there is plenty of time to soak up the sun in the hours leading up to the event.

Here’s a World Cup fact for you – Brazil has won the World Cup the most times, with five titles under their belts, while the favourites, Germany, have only won three, despite having played in the final more times than anyone else. But you’re probably just here for the food, so here’s a lovely barbecue chicken marinade recipe from BBC Good Food for you to chew over instead (a seamless segue, I’m sure you’ll agree).

Ingredients
900g boneless chicken thighs (skin-on if possible)
2 lemons (zest and juice)
1 tbsp paprika
1 tbsp mild piri-piri sauce
2 tbsp soft brown sugar
3 garlic cloves, crushed
3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
2 tbsp coriander, finely chopped

What To Do
Place the chicken in a shallow, non-metallic dish, and cover with all the other ingredients and mix everything together. Cover and chill for at least two hours, or overnight if possible, and bring to room temperature an hour before you get grilling.

Thread half the thighs onto two large metal skewers, or wooden ones soaked in water ten minutes. Repeat with the remaining thighs and another two skewers. Heat an outdoor barbecue until very hot, or use an oven grill. Place your skewers on the grill for about six minutes on one side, then turn over and cook for a further four minutes. Add a few minutes more to the cooking time for each side if they are large, and keep the heat on medium so they don’t burn. Remove and keep warm under foil until the match starts.

Gaucho

Grilled Gaucho Steak with Chimichurri

That’s the hosts covered, so it’s time to move onto the actual finalists. Germany will be squaring off against Argentina, so this is a great chance for you to try out some German and Argentinian recipes that you almost definitely don’t cook every day. Let’s start with an Argentinian dish from The Latin Kitchen.

Ingredients
2 pounds skirt steak or flank steak, trimmed
1 tbsp smoked paprika
2 tbsp salt
1 cup warm water
1 bundle fresh flat leaf parsley
8 cloves garlic
2½ tsp smoked paprika
1 tbsp fresh oregano
½ cup red wine vinegar
1tbsp lime juice
1½ cups extra virgin olive oil
1 tsp salt
½ tsp freshly ground black pepper

What To Do
To make the chilli water, mix 1tbsp paprika and the salt and water in a bowl and set aside. To make the chimichurri sauce, blend the parsley, garlic, paprika, oregano, red wine vinegar, lime juice, olive oil, salt and pepper until coarsely chopped and set aside.

Prepare a medium-hot fire on the grill. Place the steaks on the grill and baste a couple of times with chilli water. Cook for about four to six minutes on each side, then transfer to a platter to let them rest for 15 minutes. Slice the meat lengthwise into half-inch slices and toss with chimichurri sauce.

Trout

Forelle Müellerin Art (Pan-Fried Trout)

You can enjoy your steak and chimichurri more authentically with a glass of Argentine Malbec or a bottle of Quilmes or Salta beer (if you can get hold of it in the UK). But, naturally, you wouldn’t want to be quaffing Argentinian drinks if you’re supporting Germany. To support our European neighbours, you could chuck some sausages on your Brazilian barbecue, or finish the meal with a hot apfel strudel, as well as drinking Beck’s or any other less well-known German beer. Or, you could try this tasty pan-fried trout recipe, courtesy of About.com.

Ingredients
Per 2lb of fish (1½-2lb, cleaned)
3 tbsp flour
4 tbsp butter
3 tbsp lemon juice
Salt
1 tsp Worcestershire sauce (approx)
Pepper
Parsley, chopped

What To Do
Clean and dry the fish, then melt the butter in a pan. Sprinkle the fish with half the lemon juice, dredge in flour and salt lightly. Brown the trout 5-10 minutes on one side in the butter, then turn and brown the other side. Cook until the fish flakes easily and is no longer pink or jelly like – the amount of time this takes will depend on the size of the fish. Remove the trout to a platter and cover to keep it warm.

Add lemon juice to the butter in the pan and warm briefly, then add pepper and Worcestershire sauce to taste. Spoon this over the trout, sprinkle with the parsley, and serve – loosen the meat from the backbone and slip it off the bones to serve in larger pieces.

Dan Squire

Dan Squire

Dan is an ex-Fed Up & Drunker who has now been released into the wild.

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  • http://www.sustainablekitchens.co.uk Sam Shaw

    Now you are talking! There is no better pass time than sipping Caipirinhas on Ipanema beach although the best Caipirinhas I had were in Bahia, oh and if you are making them at home I would use Pirapora Cachaca and not 51. mmmmmmm

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